mPulse

Saturday, January 21, 2012

Career Reform - The Changing Face of Expertise

Empty Road - William WarbyIn August 2011, I took the title "consultant" off my business card after having it for eight years. It was sad to see the old friend leave, but it was for the best - for both consultant and for me.

Two years ago (22 months for those of you who are more precise), I composed two pieces on what it meant to me as I evolved out of the role of "analyst" and into the role of "consultant" (here) and how this meant developing the skills of a "selling consultant" (here). It was a heady time. I was learning a lot of new skills, meeting the challenges of a post-technical role, managing to a new level of "success".

Many things have changed since then. But the key lesson that I learned is that the career path that was in front of me was not headed in the direction I wanted to go. The true sign of this, that I ignored at the time, but which is so obvious to me now, is when I started counting down the days to my annual vacation.

Having just finished Onward and Delivering Happiness, I read that these moments come to all people. It's how they choose to face them that determines their happiness after.

Due to a serious of weird misfortunes, fortune shined upon me. A new opportunity was presented to me, and I was able to use it to shape a new path forward, one I think that many maturing consults imagined that their roll would look like when they started their journey.

My new role is to act as a consultant to the entire organization. And what does that mean? My goal (and I get to invent the role as I go along) is to develop and share the knowledge of the strategic use of the product line, approached from a technical and sales perspective, to help current and new members of the company not only learn the How of the product line, but the Why that motivates prospects to become company customers. I also get to see how the product plan morphs, shifts to meet new information and new ideas.

Am I happy? Yes. When I began my change from analyst to consultant, I had hoped this is where I would end up.

If I stayed the course, would I have ended up here?

Despite being a counter-factual question, I think that the answer is no. I was being squeezed, shaped, and directed by the role of consultant. I had lost control of my own career and was being driven to the next destination in a blacked-out van.

Now I have gotten out of the van, checked my bearings, and started walking in the direction I want to go in.

What's next? Well, I'm sure that in two years, I'll have something to share.

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